1) General Advice
2) Travel Agent Recommendation
3) Visa Information
4) Cash and Money
5) Phones
6) Medical Facilities
7) Food and Water
8) Gifts
9) Weather
10) Electricity
11) Computers & Internet
12) Kenyan Customs and Timekeeping
13) Appropriate Dress

General Advice

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Travel Agents

We recommend:

Elyse Harvey Lawson
P.O. Box 724377
Atlanta, GA 31139
Phone: 770-436-1334 x 100
Fax: 770-928-2659 
800-749-8785
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

www.MissionaryAirfareSearch.com
www.ViningsTravel.com 

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Visa Information

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Cash and Money

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Phones

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Medical Facilities

In case of a serious emergency, we use the referral hospital in Eldoret, about 2 hours away from Amagoro and one of the better hospitals in the country.  For most medical issues we use a small private Catholic Clinic in Bungoma, about 15 miles away.  The most common ailments are stomach issues, malaria, and typhoid, and it is therefore crucial that visitors take their malaria preventative.  

Unless in transit, you will be staying at the ACK (Anglican Church of Kenya) Diocesan Mission House in Amagoro.  Beds, sheets, blankets, pillows, towels, and mosquito nets are all provided.  The house has electricity (see below), running water, and internet.  The address is: 

The Elewana Project, Box 68, Amagoro, Kenya 50244

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Food and Water

While with us, visitors will be eating 3 meals a day of food primarily prepared at the Mission House.  Breakfast will consist of eggs, toast, cereal, bacon, fruit, juice, coffee and tea or some combination thereof.  Dinner will vary and include pasta dishes, fish, chicken (both roasted and stewed), beef (roasted and stewed), veggies and tons of fruit.  On a number of occasions, particularly for lunch, we will be eating local traditional fare provided by schools or churches.  This will consist of traditional boiled cornmeal (ugali), stewed chicken, greens, rice, and chapati (somewhere between a tortilla and a frisbee).  We work with dietary restrictions as best we can.  Visitors are welcome (and encouraged) to carry snacks with them, which may be purchased locally in town and at any of the markets we frequent.  We have plenty of safe drinking water available.  

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Gifts

Small, school related gifts are best.  This would include pencils, pens, notebooks, stickers, school t-shrits, and sports balls and equipment (soccer and volleyball).  Please bring a gift for the Bishop and his wife as well as something for your host family (for the homestay/overnight).

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Weather

Hot and rainy at times.  Cooler in the mountains

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Electricity

Kenya runs on a 220 volt electrical system with a British three-prong plug.  Most DC battery chargers (that are typically used to charge cameras, phones, computers, ipads, etc). can handle Kenya's 220 volt system without a problem.  The most you would need is the simple adapter which would allow the U.S. plug to fit into the three prong British style.  Check the back of any electrical equipment you are bringing - it will give you the range of volts it can handle. Most modern gadgets will say 100 - 240 volt.  That will work fine, as is, in Kenya.  Expect outages.

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Computers & Internet

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Kenyan Customs and Timekeeping

Kenyans are very friendly and love to have visitors and are willing to overlook any socially awkward moments in the name of being a good host.  That said, just be prepared that everything happens at its own pace and at the appropriate time, which often has nothing to do with the stated start time.  

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Appropriate Dress

Men typically wear long pants, despite the heat.  Women, particularly in a village setting, keep their shoulders covered and wear longer skirts and dresses (below the knee), though slacks are also acceptable.

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